The Teenage Guide to Stress

£7.99

After the success of Blame My Brain, which covers all the internal upsets and stresses of adolescence, I wanted to cover the external stresses: the pressures of exams, relationships, fears created by new knowledge of the world, body changes, the internet and cyber-bullying. The teenage years can be really stressful, for parents and teenagers, and sometimes full of dark fears. The Teenage Guide to Stress puts everything into perspective and shows young people that they are not alone and that there is help, whether their worries are small or big. Stress can affect us at any time of life and TTGS teaches the skills to thrive through stress.

More details and reviews further down this page.

Signing instructions

Description

Winner of the School Library Association Award 2015, with both the judges’ and readers’ awards.

After the success of Blame My Brain, which covers all the brain-related, internal changes of adolescence, I wanted to tackle the external stresses: pressures of exams, relationships, fears created by new knowledge of the world, body changes, the internet and cyber-bullying. And more.

The Teenage Guide to Stress is divided into three sections: Section One explains what stress is and looks at any differences for teenagers. Section Two deals with a number of issues that can affect teenagers – from anger, depression and sexual relationships to cyber-bullying, exams and eating disorders – and offers guidance and advice, as well as looking at how pre-existing conditions such as OCD and dyslexia are affected by adolescence. Section Three is concerned with how to deal with and prevent symptoms of stress, as well as healthy ways of looking after mind and body. At the back of the book is a glossary and list of useful resources.

I’ve had terrific feedback from those who’ve read it, including experts in mental health and child protections, and I was thrilled when it won the School Library Association award in both the judges’ and the readers’ categories. It contains a simple yet important message to all young people: You are not alone.

A few responses and reviews

This book is a must-read for all teenagers but also for those who work with young people or are parents of teenagers. It will put your mind at rest and help you understand your own stressful situations and those of the people around you. A fantastic self-help book; Nicola Morgan is non-judgemental and knowledgeable without being preachy and it’s reassuring to see her personal experiences included. Just the process of reading this book is cathartic but the guidance provided is wonderful.” (Kristy Rabbitt – We Love This Book – in the Guardian)  

Reported on Twitter by the mother of a 14yo boy who had just read TTGS cover to cover:

Mother: Did you find The Teenage Guide to Stress helpful?
Boy: No.
Mother: No?!
Boy: No, because I’m not stressed. But if I was, it would be, very!

A mother, after one of my talks:

“Last night you spoke so well and Anna – and myself – were absolutely fascinated. All the way home she talked about how she felt about different things (and I thought we already talked) and then she stayed up late reading the book. Anna never stays up late to read. Like you said, she is delighted that there is something for her age, for her issues. She worries about how much she worries about things and now she has a context for it and a way to understand her feelings and therefore a way to cope.” A mother

Teenage responses in The Guardian here and here

“This book was very motivational and I think every teenager should read it even if their lives are perfect because no one knows what anyone else could be dealing with and I think that is very important to know and understand. Therefore when you approach a new person you would know to be nice as you have no idea what goes on in their life.”

“As a teenager myself, I find life pretty stressful; there are so many important decisions to make and changes going on, so when I received this book I knew it would be right up my street. As a psychology student, I find anything to do with stress (and dealing with it) interesting, and this book didn’t disappoint.”

“… I’ve read many books on the subject of stress, but for me, this one was the most useful. It covers such a huge range of issues from friends to drugs, bullying to family relationships – pretty much anything you’re struggling with, you can find information about in here.”

“For me, the most helpful part of the book was Section Three, and even though I read the book cover to cover a few weeks ago, I still find myself referring back to it daily. It explains ways to deal with stressful situations and tips on preventing certain symptoms occurring. I found ways to deal with not being able to sleep extremely valuable as this is something that I personally suffer with.”

“Overall, I would highly recommend this book and have already told many of my friends to read it! I think that the reason Nicola Morgan really succeeds with this stress-busting book is because she doesn’t write in a patronising manner at all. I gain the impression that she really does understand what us teenagers are going through, and she has certainly made me feel as though I’m not alone, and that I can deal with stress, even if it seems like I can’t.”

A parent, via email

“I devoured Blame My Brain on a train journey to London some years ago. I have often reminded myself of sections when dealing with my teenagers. I recently decided I needed to read it again to refresh my ability to deal with my teenagers but can’t find it as I have loaned it to someone who clearly can’t be parted with it! I asked a friend if I could borrow hers and the same thing had happened to her! So I bought The Teenage Guide to Stress. Hallelujah – my daughter is now reading it! I particularly love your “Conclusion” and am going to laminate a copy and carry it around with me! I love your work and your attitude and your love for teenagers. Thank you.”